ATPL Commercial Pilot Training UK - British School of Aviation

We Wanted To Tell You About The New Pilot Training Course Configurator

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I can still remember trying to figure out my own plan to become an Airline pilot. 

In those days it really was about making phone calls and piecing together bits of information from books and magazine articles and going along to schools hoping to get lucky and being able to speak with someone who wasn’t just giving you the hard sell.

Today it’s become a lot easier, you can spend hours reading articles trying to figure out a pathway and reading conflicting views on which is the best way to train.

When we set out to build our new pilot training website we decided to get back to good old-fashioned information providing. We wanted to make it easy for prospective students, at whatever stage they are at, to be able to find all the information they need in one place.

The second stage was to create a course configurator that lets you put together a course of your own. Unusually it contains all of the prices for each stage of training and allows you to add in the accommodation costs, a per day allowance for food, etc and more importantly, the item that is often over-looked, the contingency money. It’s normal for some small extra costs to occur that haven’t planned for, e.g. extra flight hours or accommodation.

Anyway, we hope you like it. We need to point out that the “how to become a pilot” page is a good place to start if you want to get a feel for the different training routes and then read through the individual pages for each course.

Pilot Training Course Configurator

How to become a pilot

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